Water Features
Colfax Indiana

Keeping Your Garden Wall Fountain Tidy

Water fountains will last a very long time with scheduled cleaning and maintenance. A typical concern with fountains is that they tend to gather dirt and debris, so it is vital that you keep it free from this. Another factor is that water that is exposed to sunlight is vulnerable to growing algae. To prevent this, there are some simple ingredients that can be mixed into the water, such as vinegar, sea salt, or hydrogen peroxide. Another option is to blend bleach into the water, but this action can hurt wild animals and so should really be avoided.

Every 3-4 months, garden fountains should go through a serious cleaning. Before you start cleaning, all of the water must be eliminated.Keeping Garden Wall Fountain Tidy 207025070414862650.jpg When you have done this, scour inside the water reservoir with a mild detergent. Feel free to use a toothbrush if needed for any smaller crevasses. Do not leave any soap deposits in or on the fountain.

Some organisms and calcium deposits can get inside the pump, so it is recommended to take it apart and clean it completely. Soaking it in vinegar for a time will make it easier to wash. Neither rain water nor mineral water contain substances that will accumulate inside the pump, so use either over tap water if possible.

Lastly, make sure your fountain is always full by checking it every day - this will keep it in tip-top condition. Allowing the water to drop below the pump’s intake level, can cause major damage and even make the pump burn out - an undesired outcome!

The Origins of Modern Wall Fountains

Himself a highly educated man, Pope Nicholas V headed the Roman Catholic Church from 1397 till 1455 and was responsible for the translation of scores of age-old documents from their original Greek into Latin. In order to make Rome worthy of being the capital of the Christian world, the Pope decided to enhance the beauty of the city. Beginning in 1453, the ruined ancient Roman aqueduct known as the Aqua Vergine which had brought clean drinking water into the city from eight miles away, underwent reconstruction at the bidding of the Pope. The historical Roman tradition of marking the entry point of an aqueduct with an magnificent celebratory fountain, also known as a mostra, was restored by Nicholas V. The architect Leon Battista Alberti was directed by the Pope to build a wall fountain where we now see the Trevi Fountain. Modifications and extensions, included in the restored aqueduct, eventually supplied the Trevi Fountain and the well-known baroque fountains in the Piazza del Popolo and Piazza Navona with the necessary water supply.